• Commission a painting by Laura H Elliott from the ‘Landscape Moods Collection’

Commissions Are Always Welcomed

I am always delighted to create commissions, as I see each piece as a collaboration, which creates a personalised and truly unique final painting.

How do I place a commission order?

I am represented by a highly experienced gallery, called Degree Art, London, UK

My gallery link is below: https://degreeart.com/artists/laura-h-elliott

Their team can coordinate with you and we can begin the commission process:

Please contact Isobel Beauchamp (Director of Degree Art) on Isobel@DegreeArt.com or call one of their Art Advisors on 020 8980 0395.

Tell her my name, Laura H Elliott and the artwork that inspires you. The Degree Art team can then explore ideas such as: size, any of my art you love, colour scheme of your home or project and then the commission process starts.

What can I expect?

All my artworks are available for commission with Degree Art Gallery, who represent my work as a professional artist and have extensive experience.

I have been selling my work since 2006 and every artwork is of the highest standard. I have never had a return and every artwork is painted on a high quality canvases by either Loxley or Winsor Newton.

Every artwork is hand signed with my initials LHE, as below:

Inspiration from the collection, so far:

Shown below is a slide show for inspiration from my portfolio of paintings in the ‘Landscape Moods Collection’:

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Are there different paint effects?

Yes, every painting contains a unique combination of effects, with each effect adding a dimension to the final painting. Should you like any effects, they can be added to your commission:

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Feedback From Commission:

Type: Painting Commission

Location: New York, USA

“I recently purchased a beautiful piece of art from Laura Elliott. Not only was the piece exactly what I wanted, but Laura handled the whole transaction very flawlessly. I was looking around for something colourful and luckily stumbled upon this website. I saw something I loved but when inquired about purchasing it, Laura told me it was already sold. That certainly didn’t stop the search and Laura quickly responded saying she could paint one like that if I was interested and I could even choose the colours.

The next few interactions with Laura involved choosing colours and getting a proof of the painting before I had to commit. Paying was very simple through Pay Pal and we managed to come to a financial arrangement that fitted my budget. The painting was couriered as soon as my payment had gone through and it arrived within a few days. The whole transaction was dealt with very professionally and was very simple. Laura is an enthusiastic and energetic artist who has a passion for what she does. I could feel this through the friendly and personal e-mails we exchanged while she was painting my special piece.

Thank you Laura.”


See more about my work at:

I am represented by a highly experienced gallery, called Degree Art, London, UK

My artwork gallery link is below:

https://degreeart.com/artists/laura-elliott

To read more customer feedback:

https://laurahelliott.wordpress.com/customer-feedback/

Contacting Laura H Elliott BA (Hons)


Fill Out the Contact Form Below to Inquire About Any Of the Pieces Above:



All artworks & designs displayed are © Copyright by Laura H Elliott BA (Hons), Dip.

Buy my work online @ http://www.lhe-art.co.uk

Facebook https://www.facebook.com/laurahelliottart

Twitter @laurahelliott

Pintrest https://www.pinterest.com/lauraelliottart/

Linked In https://uk.linkedin.com/pub/laura-elliott-ba-hons/6b/959/533

#art #britishlandscapes #britain #landscapes #buybritish #laurahelliottart #laurahelliott #lhe #painting #metalclay #gemstones #artgallery #gallery #flux #fluxexhibition #degreeart #degreeartgallery #painting #artlover #artist #artwork #artcollector #contemporaryart #originalart #ownart #rca #contemporaryart #originalart #commissionart #buyart #buyartonline

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• Commission Your Own ‘Landscape Gems Collection’ Design

Commission a ‘Landscape Gems Collection’ design of your own with Laura H Elliott BA (Hons)


What Does A Commission Offer and How Are They Presented?

Every ‘Landscape Gems’ design created by Laura H Elliott is like a presentation and not just a design.

I have been selling my work since 2006 and every design is of the highest standard. All my designs are available in Fine 999 Silver Metal Clay for commission with Degree Art Gallery, who represent my work as a professional artist and have extensive experience.

All of my silver designs are legally hallmarked by the Goldsmiths Assay Office, London.

  • Taylor made, hand-crafted from Fine 999 Silver Metal Clay
  • Every design features 100% genuine gemstones ethically and personally sourced by Laura H Elliott BA (Hons)
  • Other features in the designs include 925 Sterling Silver and Vintage Watch Parts

  • Every design is presented in a complimentary, beautiful velvet gift box, which is the perfect way to present each piece.

  • A complimentary 18 inch chain

  • An anti-tarnish strip to keep your work perfect

  • All silver pieces made from or with fine 999 silver and/or 925 sterling silver are legally hallmarked by the Goldsmiths assay office, London

LauraHallmarkSimulatedExample

  • Every silver design comes with a beautiful hallmarking card from the Goldsmiths Assay Office London


How Do I order a Commission: A Step-by-Step Guide:

1) Select Your Designs:

Look through a selection of designs and note down the name displayed at the bottom of the image:

2) Select Your Gemstone(s) of Choice:

The key feature in every design is, of course, the genuine gemstone(s). There are hundreds of types of gemstones, which come in every colour in the rainbow. However, the typical choices are often focused on three key points:

  • Colour preferences
  • Birthstone or Zodiac gemstones
  • Gemstones that are collected by each person, such as the top 4 precious gemstones: Sapphire, Ruby, Diamonds, Emeralds

If you have a gemstone you would prefer or would like to gift in your commission, please do not hesitate to ask. This can include sought after gemstones that could be sourced/ selected from stock include:

  • Tanzanite,
  • Paraiba or Cuprian Tourmaline,
  • Spessartite Garnet

The gemstones below are a selection you can chose from:

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3) Contact My Representative Gallery Degree Art, London, UK:

I am represented by a highly experienced gallery, called Degree Art, London, UK.

All my designs are available in Fine 999 Silver/ 925 Sterling Silver for commission with Degree Art Gallery, who represent my work as a professional artist and have extensive experience.

I have been selling my work since 2006 and every design is of the highest standard. All of my silver designs are legally hallmarked by the Goldsmiths Assay Office London.

LauraHallmarkSimulatedExample

Above: Laura H Elliott Hallmark

My gallery link is below:

https://degreeart.com/artists/laura-h-elliott

Their team can coordinate with you and we can begin the commission process:

Please contact Isobel Beauchamp (Director of Degree Art) on Isobel@DegreeArt.com or call one of their Art Advisors on 020 8980 0395.

Tell her my name, Laura H Elliott and the artwork that inspires you. The Degree Art team can then explore ideas such as:

Tell them which designs in my ‘Landscape Gems Collection’ you love,
Preferred colour of the gemstones featured…

….and then the commission process starts.


Please Note:

All of my silver designs are legally hallmarked by the Goldsmiths Assay Office London. This process takes between 7-14 days.

These gemstones have been personally and ethically sourced from around the world by Laura H Elliott over the years.

Carat weights stated are ‘average total gemstone weights’ (ATGW).


Commission Feedback:


“Having seen Laura’s work at an exhibition in London, I commissioned Laura to create 2 pendant pieces of jewellery to include birthstones. She was very happy to help and very professional, producing 2 stunning original pieces. They were packaged well and arrived safely. I would highly recommend Laura’s bespoke metal clay jewellery to anyone looking for a special piece of original artwork”

______________________

Dated: 21st April 2017

Lesley Oldaker was a direct commission client Landscape Gems Collection jewellery of metal clay designer Laura Elliott BA (Hons).


Customer Feedback and Recommendations:

I have over 10 years working as both an artist and curator and have references, which can be viewed by clicking here.


About the ‘Landscape Gems Collection’:

“My love of clay was discovered at the age of 14, exploring the endless possibilities of earthenware clay, enhanced with glazes, textures and glass.

It was in 2012 when I discovered the fresh, up and coming medium of metal clay in: Fine 999 Silver, Copper and bronze. Step by step I began to explore the possibilities of this medium and after 2 years of development it transformed into the body of work I now call the ‘Landscape Gems Collection’.

When fired, an elegant transformation takes place, turning each design from the pliable clay into solid metal designs. Each piece is sculptural and unique, which often include an unusual mix of high quality gemstones along side beautiful elements, such as glass, enamel, vintage watch parts or even bolts and screws.

This series was given new momentum when I exhibited my collection at The Royal College of Art with Flux exhibition in December 2015. Since this date, my designs have adapted into a series of ever changing mini sculptures and I have not looked back since.”


Fill Out the Contact Form Below to Inquire About Any Of the Pieces Above:



All artworks & designs displayed are © Copyright by Laura H Elliott BA (Hons), Dip

Buy my work online @ http://www.lhe-art.co.uk

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/laurahelliottart

Twitter @laurahelliott

Pintrest https://www.pinterest.com/lauraelliottart/

Linked In https://uk.linkedin.com/pub/laura-elliott-ba-hons/6b/959/533

#art #britishlandscapes #britain #landscapes #buybritish #laurahelliottart #laurahelliott #lhe #painting #metalclay #gemstones #artgallery #gallery #flux #fluxexhibition #degreeart #degreeartgallery #painting #artlover #artist #artwork #artcollector #contemporaryart #originalart #ownart #rca #contemporaryart #originalart #commissionart #buyart #buyartonline

• Laura H Elliott’s Legal British Assay Office Hallmark

LauraHallmarkSimulatedExample

Above: Laura H Elliott’s Hallmark Simulated Example


Laura H Elliott’s Legal British Assay Office Hallmark

Frequently Asked Questions


Does Laura Helen Elliott have a registered hallmark?

Yes, I have registered my hallmark under my name Miss Laura Helen Elliott, with the initials LHE, as shown above.

My hallmark was registered on 13th August 2016 with the Goldsmiths Assay Office, London. All my jewellery or sculptures will fully conform to UK law.

Every design hallmarked will receive a complimentary Official Hallmarking Information Card, as shown below along side a solid silver hallmarked design:

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Above: The silver design above is legally hallmarked and is called ‘Rainbow Moonstone’, which is supplied with a hallmarking card in a gift box


What is a hallmark?

The UK requires by law that precious metals of a certain weight to be hallmarked by a UK assay office. This has been in entered into UK law to ensure customers purchase genuine precious metal over a legally specified weight.

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What weights of metals require hallmarking in UK law?

Any items that exceed the following weights all are legally required to be hallmarked Gold, Silver, Platinum or Palladium: 925 Silver: 7.78 grams 375 Gold: 1.0 grams 950 Platinum: 0.5 grams 950 Palladium: 1.0 grams

Above is the legal assay office hallmarking poster

British Hallmarks Guide Assay Office

Above: Types of Precious Metals


Are all my jewellery or sculptures in precious metal hallmarked?

Any of my jewellery or sculptures under the legal weight or are created from other base materials (for example: Copper, Bronze, Brass) will contain my sponsors mark created by the Goldsmiths Assay Office London.

Those precious metal jewellery and sculptures that are below the stated weight (for example: 1.0g for gold, 7.78g for silver and below 0.5g for platinum) may be hallmarked. There are other exemptions to the Hallmarking Act detailed in the following website page at:

https://www.thegoldsmiths.co.uk/craft/trade/assay-office/useful-downloads/

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What is the Hallmarking Act 1973?

You can view the full hallmark act at the following website page:

https://www.thegoldsmiths.co.uk/media/filer_public/6e/97/6e971213-312c-4d91-998e-04ff68ac3796/hallmarking_act.pdf

Thomson Reuters (Legal) Limited. UK Statutes Crown Copyright. Reproduced by permission of the Controller of Her Majesty’s Stationery Office. An Act to make fresh provision for the composition, assaying, marking and description of articles of, or containing, precious metals, and as to agencies for the implementation and enforcement, thereof; and for purposes connected with those matters. [25th July 1973]


All artworks & designs displayed are © Copyright by artist Laura H Elliott BA (Hons), Dip.

Quick Link @ http://www.lhe-art.co.uk

Blog Web: https://laurahelliott.wordpress.com

Facebook https://www.facebook.com/laurahelliottart

Twitter @laurahelliott

Pintrest https://www.pinterest.com/lauraelliottart/

Linked In https://uk.linkedin.com/pub/laura-elliott-ba-hons/6b/959/533

• My Guide: Learning From Masters, Picasso to Pollock to Dali 

My Guide: Learning From Masters, Picasso to Pollock to Dali

Remember © Copyright – These Are Not For Sale!!

Just Inspiration and Learning!!

ALL of my studies are now in my loft, safe and sound! They are only for me to mentally reference and to draw inspiration from, as I have explored the vastly different techniques each artists used to create every stunning artwork. I loved every piece I re-created; however, I have not re-created any artists work since 1994-1995.


Why Re-Create Masters Work?

Simply put, to learn from their expert hand and varying techniques in art. There are endless guides and techniques on how masters created artworks, this shows how much you can learn from a simple collage or drawing or study or painting. I found it a really enlightening experience to truly learn how an artist created their work. I found that t

They are a challenge to reproduce, but that is why they teaches you so much. I think master studies are worth every minute. When I re-created Picasso’s cubist work, the complex gradients of colour and shade are a lesson for perspective within painting:

In addition, when you map out the cubist artwork you learn about proportion and dimension. I think this is a way round not having to learn perspective by drawing buildings, especially as I personally dislike drawing architecture.


What Do You Mean By “Master Studies”?

During my formative years navigating the arts, I found that the way I learn how, was by doing or creating.It was aged 17, that I was set a task to create a visual and written visual essay about a master that you wished to focused on as a study, for my A Level Art and Design course… this was when I found the idea of “Master Studies”.

My A Level Art and Design

The general gist was to write about a focal style in an artists work, with visuals to support. Most of these essays ended with a simple combination of written text and postcards or printed images of their chosen artists work. I decided to challenge myself to learn even more, so I began painting the works onto canvas boards or by re-creating the sculpture to sit along-side my own original work.

I felt that this theory applied to the all artists who inspired each painting I created for the course and the subsequent final exhibition of the course in 1995:


What Masters Did you Explore?

I studied a select few during my A Level Art and Design during 1994-1996, I studied the masters:

  • Pablo Picasso
  • Claude Monet
  • Edgar Degas
  • Salvador Dali

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BELOW SHOWS THE ORIGINAL ALONG-SIDE MY MASTER STUDIES:

——————————–

Pablo Picasso:

Below: My master study of a Pablo Picasso painting (1909-10) ‘Figure dans un Fauteuil (Seated Nude, Femme nue assise)’, Displayed at: Tate Modern, London

Left: My Master Study | Right: Original By Picasso

Below: My master of a Picasso artwork ‘Guitar’ (1913) At: The Museum of Modern Art, New York
Left: My Master Study | Right: Original By Picasso

Below: My master of a Picasso artwork ‘Siphon, Glass, Newspaper, and Violin‘ (1912) At: The Moderna Museet, Stockholm

Left: My Master Study | Right: Original By Picasso

——————————–

Salvador Dali:

Below: My master of a Dali painting ‘Gala and The Angelus of Millet Before the Imminent Arrival of the Conical Anamorphoses’ (1933) the original is displayed at: National Gallery of Canada, Ottawa

Left: My Master Study | Right: Original By Dali

——————————–

Edgar Degas:

I took this literally and I began to draw masters works, with a Degas Conte Pastel drawing (shown below) titled ‘Girl drying her feet after bathing’ by Degas:

Left: My Master Study | Right: Original By Degas

Above: Master Study ‘Girl drying her feet after bathing’ by Degas


What Modern Masters Do You Admire?

It was during my A Level that I was lucky to meet and spend a whole day interviewing and exploring the studio of Royal Academian Anthony Green. He was fascinating and charming and it was a day I will never forget. The painting below is by the amazing artist whom I had the privilege of interviewing in 1995, Anthony Green RA:

Since then, I have continued to learn about artists work past and present through academic routes, including my Art and Media Batchelor of Arts with Honours. I also cannot express how important it is to visit exhibitions at large museums and galleries, such as the Tate Modern, London and so on.

One artist I adore is the mixed media creator, David Hockney. I think of him as almost like a kindred spirit to me, with his exploration of perspective in both photography and painting. The way he flips perspective strikes a cord with me as that is something I like to explore in my paintings.

David Hockney:

Above: Created by © David Hockney

Maggie Hamblin:


What past master do you recommend as a starting point?

I think Vincent Van Gough is a great starting point and you are able to see his work at major museums around the world. He has a distinct technique and lends itself to high viscosity/ 3D paints or oil paints and a really appealing subject matter and colour scheme. In addition, his work is familiar with most people and this makes him a perfect first choice.

The artwork below is ‘Sunflowers’ by Vincent Van Gough:


Who are your favourite artists and why?

My first and most enduring love is Picasso and his cubist artworks, exploring colour, perspective and the transition of three-dimensional objects into a two-dimensional framework. I believe art that resonates and moves me on a personal level has the most long lasting influence on my work.

The deepest reaction I experienced was around 1996, when I visited the Tate Modern. I walked into this high ceiling room and was faced with an enormous series of paintings by Mark Rothko. The works and atmosphere had a profound impact and I needed to sit down. After a short time, I read the information on the artworks and the pieces were painted during a dark emotional period in Rothko’s life. Certainly, this was what caused be to feel emotional, it was like the artworks and colours swallowed me into his life. I can understand his need to express himself in this manner, something I have in common with artists such as Rothko.

Every exhibition I have visited has driven my work and have explored a large range of mediums both practically and from academic reading. I have enjoyed viewing Cypriot English artist Tracey Emin’s work, feeling that her freedom of her self and her personal experiences in life move me, as she is such an open book.

In addition, contemporary British painter Jenny Saville and American photographer Nan Goldin, but the artist I feel I relate to and am directly inspired by is the British contemporary artist Maggi Hambling due to her passion for expression of her life and visual diary. Maggi’s work is expressive, fascinating and her passion for the arts and other artists work is something I admire and hope to emulate.

Other artists I would recommend are:

Picasso, Monet, Degas, Dali and Jackson Pollock


How Do I Move Beyond The Masters?

This is hard to answer, but I think you need to consider what art inspires you, what medium you enjoy and what makes you happy. I have written a blog about a simple project idea below:

https://laurahelliott.wordpress.com/2016/09/07/%e2%80%a2-%e2%80%8bartist-project-1-abstract-expressionist-landscape/?preview=true

I have a few pictures below of an original design created by me of a three-dimensional sculpture of a Jesus Lizard, inspired by Picasso and made out of painted, slotted card:

Sculpture Trail 3D Lizard by Laura H Elliott BA (Hons) 1994

Sculpture Exhibition, Wokingham 1995: This sculpture is based on a ‘Jesus Lizard’ and inspired by my ‘muse’ who is Picasso. This piece was made in a jigsaw type of design. Each piece or facet was a piece of cardboard, hand painted and slotted together to make the lizard in this picture. I loved this project and it was very ‘out of the box’ for the project.


All artworks & designs displayed are © Copyright by artist Laura H Elliott BA (Hons), Dip or the artists stated.

Quick Link @ http://www.lhe-art.co.uk

Blog Web: https://laurahelliott.wordpress.com

Facebook https://www.facebook.com/laurahelliottart

Twitter @laurahelliott

Pintrest https://www.pinterest.com/lauraelliottart/

Linked In https://uk.linkedin.com/pub/laura-elliott-ba-hons/6b/959/533

• Art = Solice = Disability = Art = Freedom

Disability is unique to everyone. This is no more so than with me.

Above: ‘Scorched Landscape’

I have always been hesitant to speak about my disability, the reasons for this is complex and hard to explain. I hope to start a dialogue in this blog and to open this part of my life to move forward.

I do not want my disability to be my sole-focus or my complete identity in life, but it is such a large part of my life, it has significantly impacted my art. 

My wish to share this part of my life, as it adds a new dimension of understanding in my work as an artist.

My art has always been an open representation of my inner self and it has reflected into the choice of colour, style and subject matter in all of my work, including the ‘Landscape Moods Collection’ mixed media paintings, started in 2002. I have created work from my heart from the age of 17, which has presented my life in my art, in every medium I have explored and studied.

My emotions are the are a pivotal catalyst which drives my work.

Above: ‘Landscape Tones II’

An organisation called ‘Disability Arts International’ (coordinated by the British Council) has made me stop and think…

…why not speak about this?!?!

About ‘Disability Arts International’:

“‘Disability Arts International’ aims to promote the work of the exciting generation of excellent disabled artists, disabled-led companies and inclusive arts organisations. It also aims to share the ways arts organisations are increasing access to the arts for disabled people as audiences and visitors.”

Find out more at:

http://www.disabilityartsinternational.org/about-us/

This organisation work to open doors, create opportunities for disabled artists and educate or inform galleries, organisations and studios. I truly feel it will add a new dimension of understanding my work as an artist.

A Bit About Me:

I was diagnosed with severe Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) in 2009, but this degenerative, destructive, auto-immune disease has been with me since my teenage years. The constant pain, lack of mobility, irritating medications and challenges it gives me are intensely frustrating. Though I have other health conditions, it is the RA that deeply affects every part of my life.

Saying this, it is what you do with pain that matters. My late father said “I do as much as I can, when I can” and it is a saying I try to lead my life by. It also makes for interesting art, which allows me a way to vent good and bad into each piece in painting and clay.

Above: ‘Purple Punk’d Velvet’ on exhibition

Every aspect of my disability changes my art journey: the way you feel emotionally, how your disability transforms your life, how you are forced to adapt your every day life, how the struggle means you cannot create freely….

As I said, disability is a subject in my life and is close to my heart

I have struggled for decades with health issues. I do not speak of it often, but why not?

I will be addressing this part of my life in an interview with a difference… called the “The Heroine’s Journey”

I am definitely no heroine, but my life has been quite a complex roller-coaster-ride and definitely fits the word of a journey.

Above: Me aged 18 at my ‘A Level Art and Design’ final exhibition

I did not realise the fine nuances of disability, until my RA flared up and has stayed active since 2008, but it is not filled with just negatives and there are many positives I try to focus on.

This is a subject close to my heart, as I have struggled for decades with physical and mental health issues. I do not speak of it often in a public forum; however, my wish to share this part of my life adds a new dimension of understanding in my work as an artist.

Above: ‘Pink Punk’d Panther’

My art has always been an open representation of my inner self and it has reflected into the choice of colour, style and subject matter in my ‘Landscape Moods Collection’ mixed media paintings, started in 2002. The effects of my health added depth, meaning and passion to my work and is like an endless pile of ideas.

The artwork above was created in 1995, listening to the soundtrack of the film ‘Natural Born Killers’

I have created work (as shown above) from my heart from the age of 17, which has embodied my life within my art, in every medium I have explored and studied. It is since I was a teenager that music was a driving force in my work, by pulling out emotions from the melody and meaning.

Above: ‘Torn’ – Sold

The art I have created since 2002 is a series of mixed media paintings, called the ‘Landscape Moods Collection’, in which my emotions play a pivotal role for each painting. Despite the fact I have drawn on my feelings since I was a teenager, it is my daily experiences that drive this body of work. This series of mixed media paintings first created in 2002, called the ‘Landscape Moods Collection’.

Why did you put the word ‘Moods’ this collection the title of ‘Landscape Moods’?

The title of this collection took me some time to consider, debate and decide upon. The title needed to be self-explanatory, clear and short. I never wanted the title to be an essay, just two words and I chose the two words that epitomises my mixed media painting collection:

‘landscape’ & ‘moods’

The title can be broken down into two concepts. The first was the subject matter, which is ‘landscapes’, and the second is the motivation or inspiration of my work, which is the word ‘moods’. My work is filled with complex meanings; however, I wanted to express who I am, my core personality or an emotion that I was battling with or celebrating.

The painting below is titled ‘Angry Skies’ and it was painted “en plein air” or outside, under cover during a hail storm, here in the UK. The rain and hail symbolised that time of my life in 2007 and these feeling poured into the painting below. 

Above: ‘Angry Skies’ (2007) Sold with London Art

My art has always been an open representation of my inner self and it has reflected into the choice of colour, style and subject matter in my ‘Landscape Moods Collection’ mixed media paintings, started in 2002.

I drew the artwork during my ‘Art and Media BA (Hons)’ 1st year which I titled ‘Facets of Self’. It was a drawing from a series which where to explore 3 words:

  1. Self Portrait
  2. Facets of Self
  3. History

I created the drawing below during my Art and Media BA (Hons), which broke down my facets of self or pieces of who I am into 3, which can be seen as positive or negative:

Focus, laughter and emotion

Above: ‘Facets of Self’


Read more About Me In Artists Interview

Laura H Elliott BA (Hons)


March 2016

The Palette Pages Laura H Elliott Artist Interview by Lisa Gray

< Click Here For Interview >

Laura Elliott Artist Interview ~ The Palette Pages

Laura Elliott Artist Interview

The Palette Pages by Lisa Gray ~ Flux Exhibition


February 2016:

Iris Art Magazine ‘Signature Style’ written by Kahlid Rhaman

“Laura’s Artist Journey is Like a Rollercoaster Ride”

< Click Here For Interview >

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Laura Elliott Artist Interview with Iris Art Magazine: ‘Laura Elliott’s art journey is a roller coaster ride’



All artworks & designs displayed are © Copyright by Laura H Elliott BA (Hons), Dip.

Buy my work online @ http://www.lhe-art.co.uk

 Facebook https://www.facebook.com/laurahelliottart

Twitter @laurahelliott

Pintrest https://www.pinterest.com/lauraelliottart/

Linked In https://uk.linkedin.com/pub/laura-elliott-ba-hons/6b/959/533

#art #britishlandscapes #britain #landscapes #buybritish #laurahelliottart #laurahelliott #lhe #painting #metalclay #gemstones #artgallery #gallery #flux #fluxexhibition #degreeart #degreeartgallery #painting #artlover #artist #artwork #artcollector #contemporaryart #originalart #ownart #rca #contemporaryart #originalart #commissionart #buyart #buyartonline

• Introducing the ‘Landscape Gems Collection’ 2017-2018

Shown below are pieces from the latest 2017/2018 ‘Landscape Gems Collection’ designs.

Each piece is available to be commissioned or purchased through my representatives Degree Art, Fenster Art, Flux Gallery and Culture Label. Every design contain an ethically sourced selection of genuine gemstone set in hand-made metal clay designs.


See my work for sale with any of the galleries and agents below:


 


All artworks & designs displayed are © Copyright by Laura H Elliott BA (Hons), Dip.

Buy my work online @ http://www.lhe-art.co.uk

Facebook https://www.facebook.com/laurahelliottart

Twitter @laurahelliott

Pintrest https://www.pinterest.com/lauraelliottart/

Linked In https://uk.linkedin.com/pub/laura-elliott-ba-hons/6b/959/533

#art #britishlandscapes #britain #landscapes #buybritish #laurahelliottart #laurahelliott #lhe #painting #metalclay #gemstones #artgallery #gallery #flux #fluxexhibition #degreeart #degreeartgallery #painting #artlover #artist #artwork #artcollector #contemporaryart #originalart #ownart #rca #contemporaryart #originalart #commissionart #buyart #buyartonline

• ‘Shedding Neon’ brings a new wave of drama to the ‘Landscape Moods Collection’

Above: ‘Shedding Punk’d Viper’ and ‘Dodge Punk’d Viper’

“Laura Elliott’s ‘Landscape Moods Collection‘ mixed media paintings reflect her desire to be constantly challenging and developing her work, which is taking a colourful leap forward in 2017.

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Her new body of mixed media paintings will explore surface textures and patterns, outline shapes and softer lines by using other mediums such as conte pastels to add softer lines, with a stark colour difference within the paint palette to add drama mood.

Above: ‘Purple Punk’d Velvet’ (2016)

Her upcoming exhibitions, during 2016 and moving into 2017, will be displaying her newest body of work.  The first painting in my new body of work started in 2016 and was titled ‘Counterpoint’. This body of work explores the concept of two opposing or contrasting elements; with the influence of texture from wood (the earth) and the formation or designs seen in waves (water) as the common thread, unifying the opposing elements of earth and water.

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Her paintings draw on these inspirations such as deer antlers which are naturally shed every year in constant renewal, exploring form and abstraction.

Her new body of mixed media paintings will explore surface textures and patterns, outline shapes and softer lines by using other mediums such as conte pastels to add softer lines, with a stark colour difference within the paint palette to add drama mood.

The metaphor for this new collection of paintings is the concept of shedding one part of life or skin and starting anew or fresh. Bright neon paints will add vibrancy, representing starting anew or fresh just like moving into a new year and body of work.

Above: ‘Pink Punk’d Panther’ – Sold

Above: ‘Flaming Punk’d Mustang’ sold during the ‘London Punk Revisited’ at 1of1 Designs with Degree Art Gallery 27th October – 24th November 2016


All artworks & designs displayed © Copyright by Laura H Elliott BA (Hons), Dip.

Buy my work online @ http://www.lhe-art.co.uk

 Facebook https://www.facebook.com/laurahelliottart

Twitter @laurahelliott

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• Art In The Heart Gallery & Marketplace

Art In The Heart Gallery & Marketplace

I am delighted to be selling my work with Art In The Heart Gallery and Marketplace. The impact of other mass produced online platforms, means that the artist/ designers are getting swept aside in the market. I see Art In the Heart making a change.

My online gallery is at: https://www.artintheheart.co.uk/marketplace/store/lheart/

“I am so happy to have this wonderful fine silver jewellery maker on my new Art in the Heart online Marketplace. She has a store with me now. When I say jewellery…there is jewellery and then there is pure art. if you want a really special treasure for a special person, please have a look at these stunning pieces.”

By: Dawn Birch-James

I am looking forward to the future with Art In The Heart Gallery and Marketplace with Dawn Birch-James and her team


All artworks & designs displayed are © Copyright by Laura H Elliott BA (Hons), Dip

Buy my work online @ http://www.lhe-art.co.uk

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/laurahelliottart

Twitter @laurahelliott

Pintrest https://www.pinterest.com/lauraelliottart/

Linked In https://uk.linkedin.com/pub/laura-elliott-ba-hons/6b/959/533

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• Artist Interview: Degree Art Gallery Interview With Laura H Elliott BA (Hons)

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Degree Art Gallery Artist Interview with Laura H Elliott BA (Hons)

Date: 14th March 2017

Read my full Degree Art Gallery artist interview at:

https://degreeart.com/blog/laura-h-elliott-energetic-art-featuring-emotional-content

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1) Which art movement do you consider most influential on your practice?

“The key influence in my work is from abstract expressionism, drawing inspiration from their energetic art featuring emotional content, spontaneous gestures, and often in monumental sizes. The way each artist practiced, channeled their emotions into each artwork has given me the conviction and has driven my work forward:

  • Willem de Kooning
  • Clyfford Still
  • Helen Frankenthaler
  • Mark Rothko

The quote below epitomizes why this movement drives my work, inspiring me to constantly channel my life and emotions into each artwork:

“I’m not interested in ‘abstracting’ or taking things out or reducing painting to design, form, line, and color. I paint this way because I can keep putting more things in it – drama, anger, pain, love, a figure, a horse, and my ideas about space. Through your eyes it again becomes an emotion or idea.” (Quote by Willem de Kooning).”

2) Where do you go and when to make your best art?

“My love of the outdoors, especially during the summer, always spurs my creativity. I now have a wonderful, compact or small, home studio where I can create and explore my art freely.”

3) How do you describe your ‘creative process’?

“My creative process is different in the two mediums I specialise in, which are: mixed media painting and metal clay. Due to my disability, my mediums require assistance during the creative processes, but this adds love into every piece I create. Once I pick-up my brush or my piece of clay, all my worries are put aside. Art is truly my therapy.

Painting:

This medium is truly an unplanned process. The only aspect that I plan is my colour scheme, I layout my paints and other mediums, to create in a sub-conscious manner, using colour and mood to drive my work. Each painting is created in layers, building up colour and tones step-by-step, until I feel I have achieved the background. Then I add details and my signature.
It was 2016 when my paintings moved back into a free-flowing, abstract expressionist style featuring a bright colour palette. This highly enjoyable, free, relaxed painting style reflecting how my life has settled and how my emotions ebb and flow at this point in my life.

Metal Clay Designs:

This medium is the complete opposite, due to the nature of clay and the amount of tools required. I plan the basics of my designs in rough sketches and use these ideas as a starting point for each design. It is once I have started to create each piece that I refine the overall design and I can then create instinctively, as I do when I paint. Each design is a strict step-by-step process as below with a minimum of 12 steps for even the smallest metal clay design:

  1. Prepare the clay ready to work with
  2. Apply textures to the clay
  3. Roll the clay (thickness is dependent on type of clay being used) and cut for each element of the design
  4. Build the design
  5. Leave to air dry
  6. Kiln fire the design
  7. Soak in Picklean to remove fire scale
  8. Rinse with bicarb to neutralise Picklean
  9. Start to shine the fired clay with a wire brush
  10. Use an agate burnisher or polisher for bright shine
  11. Shine the piece with protective wax
  12. Mount stones
  13. The piece is ready to be worn

More about my work and my working process on my blog:

https://laurahelliott.wordpress.com

4) Which artist, living or deceased, is the greatest inspiration to you?

“My first and most enduring love is the work of master artist Picasso and his cubist artworks, exploring colour, perspective and the transition of three-dimensional objects into a two-dimensional framework.

In addition, I have visited countless exhibitions and have explored a large range of mediums both practically and through academic reading. The artist that I deeply admire is David Hockney, who I think of almost like a kindred spirit to me. His exploration of perspective in both photography and painting are fascinating and reminds me of the cubist movement in many ways. The way Hockney flips perspective strikes a cord with me as that is something I like to play with in my paintings, along side the inspiration of the abstract expressionist movement.”

5) If you weren’t an artist, what would you do?

“I worked professionally in the nursing field from the age of 18 until I was 23. I adored the interaction with people, the challenges it brought and helping other people. Saying this, I was artistic as a young child, so the love and imagination has been there my whole life.”

6) What do you listen to for inspiration?

“It was when I moved into my late teens and early 20s, I found my paintings where inspired by music. I am a lover of heavy metal, filled with energy and feeling; however, I enjoy listening to all types of music now I am older.”

7) Which 3 artists would you collect work by if money was no object?

  1. Picasso – Sculptures
  2. Clyfford Still
  3. Jenny Saville

8) If your dream museum or collection owner came calling, which would it be?

“Louvre Museum, Paris, France.”

9) What is your key piece of advice for artists embarking on a fine art or creative degree today?

“Use the summer breaks to create more artworks and read, especially the summer break between the 2nd and 3rd year. That break enables you to start your dissertation and be ahead for the start of the 3rd year. The 3rd year is so busy you need all the time you can get and it will significantly reduce your stress and work load.”

10) What is your favourite book of all time (fiction or non fiction)?

“I do not have an all time favourite book; however, I am a lover of reading and learning about life stories of people from all backgrounds, around the world.”

11) If you could hang or place your artwork in one non traditional art setting, where would that be?

“The non-traditional setting would be a Gothic church architecture, because of the contradiction having modern with Gothic.”

12) What was the biggest lesson your university course or time studying taught you?

“I was diagnosed in 2003 with Dyspraxia and Dyslexia, which was life changing. These learning difficulties of Dyspraxia and Dyslexia had profoundly impacted on my academic standard and life. I started university with low grades, but as time passed I worked really hard by always attending learning support tuition and reading as much as I could get my hands on. I truly believe that academic study is as important as the practical practice of art. The academic perspective on your course allows you to take a quality skill set into the art world, especially regarding working with spoken language, galleries and paperwork linked to this. I know that through my academic studies my quality of spoken language and organisational skills has significantly improved.

I always say that everyone should use the library as it is full of inspiration, knowledge and facilities to develop your education. Use the library staff and tap into journals as a quick way to understand a subject, especially as they are a few pages maximum. In addition, make the most of resources such as learning support to improve your written work and your support work during modules you study.

Mainly….enjoy your course!

With my best wishes.”

13) And finally, if we were to fast forward 10 years, where would we find you?

“I would still be working with Degree Art Gallery and continue to exhibit in new UK galleries and locations. I am working on a new body of work and high quality limited edition prints.

I would like to have achieved membership to ‘The Society of Women Artists’.”


All artworks & designs displayed are © Copyright by Laura H Elliott BA (Hons), Dip.

Buy my work online @ http://www.lhe-art.co.uk

Facebook https://www.facebook.com/laurahelliottart

Twitter @laurahelliott

Pintrest https://www.pinterest.com/lauraelliottart/

Linked In https://uk.linkedin.com/pub/laura-elliott-ba-hons/6b/959/533

#art #britishlandscapes #britain #landscapes #buybritish #laurahelliottart #laurahelliott #lhe #painting #metalclay #gemstones #artgallery #gallery #flux #fluxexhibition #degreeart #degreeartgallery #painting #artlover #artist #artwork #artcollector #contemporaryart #originalart #ownart #rca #contemporaryart #originalart #commissionart #buyart #buyartonline

Artwork Focus: Trying To Find My Artist Voice, Having My Artwork Put In The Skip & How I Was Inspired By Picasso

It is always hard to start your journey as an artist, with my journey starting in 1992. It has taken me around the world and I have exhibited at some stunning galleries, with an amazing collection of working artists and selling through my representative galleries.

Saying this, you always have to start somewhere and you ask yourself…

What do you create? Which medium do you chose? What subject do you paint? Where do you start in creating work?

I wanted to share my story below, to offer insight into my own artist journey, with the help to inspire…

Though, at first, my journey was a bit haphazard in creating original art, I eventually found my feet and it came to me naturally, drawing on my life long, never ending imagination. Saying this, it was in around 1991 when I first found the 2 mediums I love to this day…

…clay and acrylic paint

Artists past and present have a crucial influence in every artists journey. My life-time adoration of Picasso began in 1992 through books and gallery visits. By drawing inspiration from Picasso’s work, it meant that I explored many ways to create my artworks for my A Level Art and Design in 1995. I found cubism fascinating (specifically Picasso’s) and the definition below explains it in detail:

When I learned about Picasso I visited the Tate Modern and saw one of his sculpture portraits or busts and I was energized:

Pablo Picasso ‘Head of a Woman (Fernande)’ (1909) At: The Tate Modern, London

I knew my next step!! I began to create a sculpture created with:

  • A wooden base
  • Chicken wire forming the main shape
  • Plaster of Paris bandages
  • Card to create hair round the face and to form the pony tail at the back
  • Acrylic paint to create form, depth and to emulate how Picasso creates a 3D effect on a 2D canvas

I tested out all manner of ideas: drawings, paintings and then I realized that there was a way forward…sculpture. For one of my course work pieces, I wanted to explore and create my own unique sculpture, which reversed how Picasso created a 3D effect on a 2D canvas.

The sculpture shown below shows my unfinished sculpture, with my apologies for the poor quality photographs!:

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Above: Left = face / Right = right hand side of head with hair in a bunch

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Above: Left = left hand side of the head / Right = reverse of head with the stripes swept into a pony tail

Despite my enjoyment and desire to create new ideas, my teacher disliked it so much, she told me to put it in the bin or more precisely the skip!!

I am sure you would understand it was quite heart breaking; however, before I threw it away I took photographs. This piece, shown below, is a reproduction of a self portrait: my hair brushed back into a pony tail with wisps of hair surrounding my face.

Once the piece started to take shape and I felt obliged to stop this artwork and begin another. It was in 1994 that I began to explore the ideas of playing with mediums, like I mentioned above; however, this was strongly discouraged by my teachers!!

The good news is that their influenced stopped in 1995, when I began to do what *I* wanted to do and I started to build a portrait sculpture.

I continued with this new drive and confidence, by creating what *I* wanted to do and in 1995 I created a slotted card sculpture (shown below), painted with abstract designs with acrylic paint:

Despite this confidence, some pieces I was directed to create in a certain style and medium, so some works I compromised and created something more traditional. I managed to keep some of my independence by incorporated structural support in 1 of my 3 my final exhibition artworks:

https://laurahelliott.wordpress.com/2017/01/01/exhibition-review-my-first-group-exhibition/

Below is an example of Picasso’s amazing work that also inspired me:

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All artworks & designs displayed are © Copyright by artist Laura H Elliott BA (Hons), Dip.

Quick Link @ http://www.lhe-art.co.uk

Blog Web: https://laurahelliott.wordpress.com

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Twitter @laurahelliott

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• Review: Artsy Editorial – Kandinsky’s How To Be An Artist

Above:

Above: “Composition VII” (1913) by Wassily Kandinsky – In Collection At: The State Tretyakov Gallery

Review: Artsy-Editorial – Kandinsky’s How To Be An Artist

“I came across a fascinating editorial article on the Artsy website, written by author Rachel Lebowitz, about a master artist whom I deeply admire, the Russian painter Wassily Kandinsky. As I always do in my blog’s, I will interpret this article and apply it to my personal experience and practice in the arts.

Kandinsky taught at the Bauhaus for an 11-year period and detailed his art theories in books. He had complex and detailed ideas to convey about the practice and philosophy of art. This Artsy Editorial focused his ideas into five points of interest or “lessons”. Although I feel they are interesting “lessons” for my own painting practices I really believe they show only 5 of a complex and involved philosophy of the past master Kandinsky.

The true depth of Kandinsky’s concepts are in his books he authored. The first book he wrote was titled ‘Concerning the Spiritual in Art’ (1911). Within this book he laid out his tenets for artistic creation as a spiritual act. Kandinsky wrote a book called ‘In Point and Line to Plane’ (1926) in which he expands on elements such as rhythm and amplification. Each of these books delve in detail into his progressive practice and exploration as both a painter and tutor and could be of great interest if you wish to read about Kandinsky’s theories of practice.

The article author Rachel Lebowitz states:

“…Kandinsky did not intend for his theories to be prescriptive. Art making, he insisted, was about freedom. Nevertheless, there are several lessons that artists should heed if they are to meet Kandinsky’s requirements.” (1)

In my opinion, this article describes how Kandinsky felt his theories as ideas which can be drawn from, by artists. Therefore, although this article refers to each point as “lessons”, my opinion is that I do not think they should be so finite, maybe they should be guides, not lessons.

Kandinsky did not intend for his theories to be prescriptive. Art making, he insisted, was about freedom. Nevertheless, there are several lessons that artists should heed if they are to meet Kandinsky’s theories.

We start with five below that where highlighted in the Artsy article and the five “Lessons” are as follows:

Wassily Kandinsky  Dreamy Improvisation, 1913  Pinakothek der Moderne, Bayerische Staatsgemäldesammlungen,

Above: Wassily Kandinsky ‘Dreamy Improvisation’ (1913)
– In Collection At: Pinakothek der Moderne, Bayerische Staatsgemäldesammlungen.

Lesson #1: Express your inner world, not the latest artistic trends

If we reflect on the history of art, it is littered with ever changing movements in art, which I feel could be referred to as “trends”. I always want to stay true to who I am as both a person and artist; therefore, I always draw on who I am as a person, with my artworks interpreting my persona and life experiences. I try to not focus on external trends and influences towards my work, but I do use this to progress and push my ideas forward.

The meaning of the word “merit” or the phrase I would chose to use is “artistic merit”. This phrase was not 100% clear to me when considering if that was directly relevant, so I looked up the definition of “artistic merit”:

“Artistic merit is a crucial term, as pertains to visual art. However, many people fail to distinguish between the problem of distinguishing art from non-art and the problem of distinguishing good art from bad art. In many cases, people claim that such-and-such object is “not art” or “not real art” when they intend to say that they do not consider it to be good or successful art.” (3)

I believe that art trends are interwoven with the concept of “artistic merit” or what people consider the value in art is always subjective; therefore, it is intrinsically linked with “artistic trends”.

Above: Wassily Kandinsky ‘Composition in red and black’ (1920) – In Collection At: The State Museum of Art, Tashkent

Lesson #2: Don’t paint things. Paint in abstract form

I understand the thought behind this lesson; however, I do not agree with blanket opinions on what an artist should or shouldn’t create.

On a personal level, lesson #2 has an interesting point regarding my own artistic journey and practice. Over the years I have always had the desire to further abstract my ideas and this is a style that I now feel freedom and peace within. However, I am talking about my work and this does not apply to each artist.

Above: ‘Mirage’ (2016) by Laura H Elliott

Every artist interprets life in their own individual way. This reiterates that art is highly subjective and also highlights how trends can impact in the arts and highlights how lesson #1 is hard to follow.

It was during the time when I was 16-18 years old that I had a teacher who always pushed me into direct replication or realism. This was evident in both her projects she gave us and her regular interventions when I was creating artworks. It was only aged 17, that I rejected her beliefs and I began to create what I wanted. It was at this age when I created an abstract sculpture. This piece was inspired by Picasso and based on an amphibian, often named as a ‘Jesus Lizard’ as it runs across the surface of water.

When I was 25 I began studying an Art and Media Diploma. It was during this time I was guided by a vastly different, vibrant tutor who encouraged a self-directed practices. It was a refreshing change and has directly contributed to my current practices to this day.

The article states how art is an “…outward manifestation of the artist’s psyche—of his or her authentic thoughts and feelings” (1).

I was 25 when I returned to studying and practicing art, having worked in the nursing field for years. I left behind direct ‘replicas’ of the world I saw around me and began to relax and move towards abstraction or simplification in my art. I find my abstract work a relaxing and deeply enjoyable experience, a new freedom. I think this lesson does not address how complex and intricate the process of development is an artists and, therefore, this lesson is not a belief I would support.

Above: Wassily Kandinsky ‘Gespannt im Winkel’ (1930)
– In Collection At: Collection Kunstmuseum Bern

Lesson #3: Approach color as a window into the human soul

The article states that inspiration for Kandinsky was found in the

“…Fauvist paintings he saw while living in Paris from 1906 to 1907—with their wild hues that were entirely divorced from the real world—proved to be even more influential. Embracing this type of freedom in color.” (1)

I think this encompasses my own practice and passion. I find freedom in colours, with each choice expressing my inner emotions and moods, allowing them to be expressed to the world. When I paint in an abstract expressionist style it allows me to relax and find true solace from both my mental and physical disabilities. In a way, they are a window into my soul and the soul of every artist, including Kandinsky.

Wassily Kandinsky ‘Violett’ (1923) – In Collection At: Redfern Gallery Ltd.

Lesson #4: Inject rhythm into your painting, like a musical score

I am not sure how to explain my own work in relation to music. I have had a deep seated passion and ear for music and the layers contained in every piece I hear. I have previously written about the impact of music on my work and this passion and inspiration has not dissipated. Granted, I do not deafen both myself and family with heavy metal anymore, but I listen and enjoy all types and styles as time passes.

Above: ‘Joy’ (2003) by Laura H Elliott

This article says Kandinsky felt “…as an artist used colors, he or she was in effect playing different musical notes, causing [he said] vibrations in the soul” (1).

Different colours resonate with each of us in different ways and this is how I interpret this idea by Kandinsky. When collectors buy my work, I see a tangible response and this could be the vibrations Kandinsky speaks of.

The article goes on to state that “…a painting would do well to be composed like a musical score.” I see a rhythm in all artworks, but I interpret this in an emotional response due to the person I am: emotional, complex and passionate.

I use my art as a therapy and see vibrations as emotion during and after creating each piece of work. My work since 2016 has contained a new wave of colours and this might enhance and develop my work like a piece of music, thus creating a rhythm.

Wassily Kandinsky ‘Composition’ (1925) – In Collection at: Leila Heller Gallery

Lesson #5: By creating original work, you will further the cause of humanity

This is a grandeous statement, however, I agree with its sentiment. It has to be said that art has been academically proven to be a key component in our lives and well-being, a therapy, so lesson #5 is the truth. Speaking for myself, art is a fundamental part of who I am as a individual and gives me clarity, solace and strength.

Above: ‘Forever Grateful’ by Laura H Elliott

I have to agree with lesson #5 as it highlights my own belief in work as an artist. I truly believe that art helps humanities living and well-being, despite the commonly held point of view that art is not as fundamentally important as academic areas.”

So….What do you think of Kandinsky’s five lessons?

Wassily Kandinsky ‘Untitled’ (1921) – In Collection At: Kunstmuseum Basel, Basel

Sources and Useful Links:

1) https://www.artsy.net/article/artsy-editorial-artist-kandinsky/amp

2) http://www.wassilykandinsky.net/book-117.php

3) http://www.definitions.net/definition/artistic%20merit

4) http://www.wassily-kandinsky.org/

5) http://studiosixtysix.tumblr.com/post/151158596757/13reasons

6) http://www.forbes.com/sites/drewhendricks/2015/01/12/can-office-artwork-influence-employee-productivity/#243c119d2c44

7) https://m.facebook.com/story.php?story_fbid=1138946616232550&id=100003516670643

8) http://studiosixtysix.tumblr.com/post/151158596757/13reasons

9) http://www.forbes.com/sites/drewhendricks/2015/01/12/can-office-artwork-influence-employee-productivity/#243c119d2c


All artworks & designs displayed are © Copyright by Laura H Elliott BA (Hons), Dip

Buy my work online @ http://www.lhe-art.co.uk

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/laurahelliottart

Twitter @laurahelliott

Pintrest https://www.pinterest.com/lauraelliottart/

Linked In https://uk.linkedin.com/pub/laura-elliott-ba-hons/6b/959/533

#art #britishlandscapes #britain #landscapes #buybritish #laurahelliottart #laurahelliott #lhe #painting