• My Guide: Learning From Masters, Picasso to Pollock to Dali

My Guide: Learning From Masters, Picasso to Pollock to Dali

Remember © Copyright – These Are Not For Sale!!

Just Inspiration and Learning!!

ALL of my studies are now in my loft, safe and sound! They are only for me to mentally reference and to draw inspiration from, as I have explored the vastly different techniques each artists used to create every stunning artwork. I loved every piece I re-created; however, I have not re-created any artists work since 1994-1995.


Why Re-Create Masters Work?

Simply put, to learn from their expert hand and varying techniques in art. There are endless guides and techniques on how masters created artworks, this shows how much you can learn from a simple collage or drawing or study or painting. I found it a really enlightening experience to truly learn how an artist created their work. I found that t

They are a challenge to reproduce, but that is why they teaches you so much. I think master studies are worth every minute. When I re-created Picasso’s cubist work, the complex gradients of colour and shade are a lesson for perspective within painting:

In addition, when you map out the cubist artwork you learn about proportion and dimension. I think this is a way round not having to learn perspective by drawing buildings, especially as I personally dislike drawing architecture.


What Do You Mean By “Master Studies”?

During my formative years navigating the arts, I found that the way I learn how, was by doing or creating.It was aged 17, that I was set a task to create a visual and written visual essay about a master that you wished to focused on as a study, for my A Level Art and Design course… this was when I found the idea of “Master Studies”.

My A Level Art and Design

The general gist was to write about a focal style in an artists work, with visuals to support. Most of these essays ended with a simple combination of written text and postcards or printed images of their chosen artists work. I decided to challenge myself to learn even more, so I began painting the works onto canvas boards or by re-creating the sculpture to sit along-side my own original work.

I felt that this theory applied to the all artists who inspired each painting I created for the course and the subsequent final exhibition of the course in 1995:


What Masters Did you Explore?

I studied a select few during my A Level Art and Design during 1994-1996, I studied the masters:

  • Pablo Picasso
  • Claude Monet
  • Edgar Degas
  • Salvador Dali

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BELOW SHOWS THE ORIGINAL ALONG-SIDE MY MASTER STUDIES:

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Pablo Picasso:

Below:My master study of a Pablo Picasso painting (1909-10) ‘Figure dans un Fauteuil (Seated Nude, Femme nue assise)’, Displayed at: Tate Modern, London

Left: My Master Study | Right: Original By Picasso

Below: My master of a Picasso artwork ‘Guitar’ (1913) At: The Museum of Modern Art, New York
Left: My Master Study | Right: Original By Picasso

Below: My master of a Picasso artwork ‘Siphon, Glass, Newspaper, and Violin‘ (1912) At: The Moderna Museet, Stockholm

Left: My Master Study | Right: Original By Picasso

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Salvador Dali:

Below: My master of a Dali painting ‘Gala and The Angelus of Millet Before the Imminent Arrival of the Conical Anamorphoses’ (1933) the original is displayed at: National Gallery of Canada, Ottawa

Left: My Master Study | Right: Original By Dali

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Edgar Degas:

I took this literally and I began to draw masters works, with a Degas Conte Pastel drawing (shown below) titled ‘Girl drying her feet after bathing’ by Degas:

Left: My Master Study | Right: Original By Degas

Above: Master Study ‘Girl drying her feet after bathing’ by Degas


What Modern Masters Do You Admire?

It was during my A Level that I was lucky to meet and spend a whole day interviewing and exploring the studio of Royal Academian Anthony Green. He was fascinating and charming and it was a day I will never forget. The painting below is by the amazing artist whom I had the privilege of interviewing in 1995, Anthony Green RA:

Since then, I have continued to learn about artists work past and present through academic routes, including my Art and Media Batchelor of Arts with Honours. I also cannot express how important it is to visit exhibitions at large museums and galleries, such as the Tate Modern, London and so on.

One artist I adore is the mixed media creator, David Hockney. I think of him as almost like a kindred spirit to me, with his exploration of perspective in both photography and painting. The way he flips perspective strikes a cord with me as that is something I like to explore in my paintings.

David Hockney:

Above: Created by © David Hockney

Maggie Hamblin:


What past master do you recommend as a starting point?

I think Vincent Van Gough is a great starting point and you are able to see his work at major museums around the world. He has a distinct technique and lends itself to high viscosity/ 3D paints or oil paints and a really appealing subject matter and colour scheme. In addition, his work is familiar with most people and this makes him a perfect first choice.

The artwork below is ‘Sunflowers’ by Vincent Van Gough:


Who are your favourite artists and why?

My first and most enduring love is Picasso and his cubist artworks, exploring colour, perspective and the transition of three-dimensional objects into a two-dimensional framework. I believe art that resonates and moves me on a personal level has the most long lasting influence on my work.

The deepest reaction I experienced was around 1996, when I visited the Tate Modern. I walked into this high ceiling room and was faced with an enormous series of paintings by Mark Rothko. The works and atmosphere had a profound impact and I needed to sit down. After a short time, I read the information on the artworks and the pieces were painted during a dark emotional period in Rothko’s life. Certainly, this was what caused be to feel emotional, it was like the artworks and colours swallowed me into his life. I can understand his need to express himself in this manner, something I have in common with artists such as Rothko.

Every exhibition I have visited has driven my work and have explored a large range of mediums both practically and from academic reading. I have enjoyed viewing Cypriot English artist Tracey Emin’s work, feeling that her freedom of her self and her personal experiences in life move me, as she is such an open book.

In addition, contemporary British painter Jenny Saville and American photographer Nan Goldin, but the artist I feel I relate to and am directly inspired by is the British contemporary artist Maggi Hambling due to her passion for expression of her life and visual diary. Maggi’s work is expressive, fascinating and her passion for the arts and other artists work is something I admire and hope to emulate.

Other artists I would recommend are:

Picasso, Monet, Degas, Dali and Jackson Pollock


How Do I Move Beyond The Masters?

This is hard to answer, but I think you need to consider what art inspires you, what medium you enjoy and what makes you happy. I have written a blog about a simple project idea below:

https://laurahelliott.wordpress.com/2016/09/07/%e2%80%a2-%e2%80%8bartist-project-1-abstract-expressionist-landscape/?preview=true

I have a few pictures below of an original design created by me of a three-dimensional sculpture of a Jesus Lizard, inspired by Picasso and made out of painted, slotted card:

Sculpture Trail 3D Lizard by Laura H Elliott BA (Hons) 1994

Sculpture Exhibition, Wokingham 1995: This sculpture is based on a ‘Jesus Lizard’ and inspired by my ‘muse’ who is Picasso. This piece was made in a jigsaw type of design. Each piece or facet was a piece of cardboard, hand painted and slotted together to make the lizard in this picture. I loved this project and it was very ‘out of the box’ for the project.


FURTHER READING:

The following link is a fascinating article from @artsy that speaks about this subject, That, by physically reproducing masters art (which are never for sale), you learn how they created their art and it teaches you a wealth of information. After all, art is learnt by physically doing/ painting/ building:

https://www.artsy.net/article/artsy-editorial-copying-peoples-art-boost-creativity


All artworks & designs displayed are © Copyright by artist Laura H Elliott BA (Hons), Dip or the artists stated.

Quick Link @ http://www.lhe-art.co.uk

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