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• Creative Coverage: A New Page In 2018 Has Turned

Creative Coverage: A New Page In 2018 Has Turned

I am delighted to be represented by artist agency, ‘Creative Coverage‘. I am looking forward to 2018 onwards with Creative Coverage along-side.

See my dedicated page at: http://www.creativecoverage.co.uk/artists-page/item/864-laura-elliott

About Creative Coverage:

“Creative Coverage members are selected on merit. We handle all aspects of marketing for them and have an excellent track record for delivering results. We also collaborate with venues to deliver exhibitions. Ultimately, Creative Coverage delivers time-saving services and opportunities that help artists, craftspeople and galleries to become more successful.”

Tim and Caroline Saunders (Co-founders)


All artworks & designs displayed are © Copyright by Laura H Elliott BA (Hons), Dip

Buy my work online @ http://www.lhe-art.co.uk

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/laurahelliottart

Twitter @laurahelliott

Pintrest https://www.pinterest.com/lauraelliottart/

Linked In https://uk.linkedin.com/pub/laura-elliott-ba-hons/6b/959/533

#art #britishlandscapes #britain #landscapes #buybritish #laurahelliottart #laurahelliott #lhe #painting #metalclay #gemstones #artgallery #gallery #flux #fluxexhibition #degreeart #degreeartgallery #painting #artlover #artist #artwork #artcollector #contemporaryart #originalart #ownart #rca #contemporaryart #originalart #commissionart #buyart #buyartonline

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• Gallery Piccolo “Art To Inspire Young Minds”

Gallery Piccolo “Art To Inspire Young Minds” featuring mixed media paintings, drawings and prints by Laura H Elliott

It was through the social media platform Twitter I came across Gallery Piccolo. I loved their concept of how you can change what children’s rooms can contain. Not the same art you may come across in a ‘conventional’ children’s shop or mainstream outlets.

After having a think, I shared with Gallery Piccolo my abstract artworks. My mixed media paintings vary in tone; however, there is a palette that has always appealed to my niece and nephew and this is where my work fits into Gallery Piccolo’s vision for a younger audience. This is as follows:

My nephew is always looking at my work suggesting what he can see in it, as it is abstract and peeks his imagination. It is like when I used to talk to my Dad imagining what clouds look like. I thought it could be a bit different approach to children’s art.


About Gallery Piccolo:

“At Gallery Piccolo we offer really inspiring art that will encourage children to think, learn and to emulate what they see.   We are on a mission to elevate the standard of art that children are exposed to and push the back the boundaries of what is considered suitable for a child’s room. We aim for serious inspiration to stretch young minds…..

Our carefully curated range of beautiful quality limited edition and open edition prints, and our unique pieces will have enduring appeal and allow you to invest in contemporary artists’ work that your children will never tire of and will treasure for a life-time.

The idea for Gallery Piccolo was formed through my own experiences of searching for art for my children’s rooms. I became frustrated with the lack of good quality original art which is suitable for a child’s room.  I believe children respond positively to something more challenging and visually stimulating and greater credit can be given to them in terms of their aesthetic tastes.

My love of art developed at school age and I pursued it through my education and early career working in a commercial print gallery.  The work on this site has been selected and curated specifically to meet our vision for exposing our children to original art.

I hope this site will provide you with what you are looking for and that you will find something spectacular for your children.

Thank you for reading, and I hope you enjoy what you see.”

Emma Cale, Director, Gallery Piccolo


All artworks & designs displayed are © Copyright by Laura H Elliott BA (Hons), Dip

Buy my work online @ http://www.lhe-art.co.uk

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/laurahelliottart

Twitter @laurahelliott

Pintrest https://www.pinterest.com/lauraelliottart/

Linked In https://uk.linkedin.com/pub/laura-elliott-ba-hons/6b/959/533

#art #britishlandscapes #britain #landscapes #buybritish #laurahelliottart #laurahelliott #lhe #painting #metalclay #gemstones #artgallery #gallery #flux #fluxexhibition #degreeart #degreeartgallery #painting #artlover #artist #artwork #artcollector #contemporaryart #originalart #ownart #rca #contemporaryart #originalart #commissionart #buyart #buyartonline

• Commission Your Own ‘Landscape Gems Collection’ Design

Commission a ‘Landscape Gems Collection’ design of your own with Laura H Elliott BA (Hons)


What Does A Commission Offer and How Are They Presented?

Every ‘Landscape Gems’ design created by Laura H Elliott is like a presentation and not just a design.

I have been selling my work since 2006 and every design is of the highest standard. All my designs are available in Fine 999 Silver Metal Clay for commission with Degree Art Gallery, who represent my work as a professional artist and have extensive experience.

All of my silver designs are legally hallmarked by the Goldsmiths Assay Office, London.

  • Taylor made, hand-crafted from Fine 999 Silver Metal Clay
  • Every design features 100% genuine gemstones ethically and personally sourced by Laura H Elliott BA (Hons)
  • Other features in the designs include 925 Sterling Silver and Vintage Watch Parts

  • Every design is presented in a complimentary, beautiful velvet gift box, which is the perfect way to present each piece.

  • A complimentary 18 inch chain

  • An anti-tarnish strip to keep your work perfect

  • All silver pieces made from or with fine 999 silver and/or 925 sterling silver are legally hallmarked by the Goldsmiths assay office, London

LauraHallmarkSimulatedExample

  • Every silver design comes with a beautiful hallmarking card from the Goldsmiths Assay Office London


How Do I order a Commission: A Step-by-Step Guide:

1) Select Your Designs:

Look through a selection of designs and note down the name displayed at the bottom of the image:

2) Select Your Gemstone(s) of Choice:

The key feature in every design is, of course, the genuine gemstone(s). There are hundreds of types of gemstones, which come in every colour in the rainbow. However, the typical choices are often focused on three key points:

  • Colour preferences
  • Birthstone or Zodiac gemstones
  • Gemstones that are collected by each person, such as the top 4 precious gemstones: Sapphire, Ruby, Diamonds, Emeralds

If you have a gemstone you would prefer or would like to gift in your commission, please do not hesitate to ask. This can include sought after gemstones that could be sourced/ selected from stock include:

  • Tanzanite,
  • Paraiba or Cuprian Tourmaline,
  • Spessartite Garnet

The gemstones below are a selection you can chose from:

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

3) Contact My Representative Gallery Degree Art, London, UK:

I am represented by a highly experienced gallery, called Degree Art, London, UK.

All my designs are available in Fine 999 Silver/ 925 Sterling Silver for commission with Degree Art Gallery, who represent my work as a professional artist and have extensive experience.

I have been selling my work since 2006 and every design is of the highest standard. All of my silver designs are legally hallmarked by the Goldsmiths Assay Office London.

LauraHallmarkSimulatedExample

Above: Laura H Elliott Hallmark

My gallery link is below:

https://degreeart.com/artists/laura-h-elliott

Their team can coordinate with you and we can begin the commission process:

Please contact Isobel Beauchamp (Director of Degree Art) on Isobel@DegreeArt.com or call one of their Art Advisors on 020 8980 0395.

Tell her my name, Laura H Elliott and the artwork that inspires you. The Degree Art team can then explore ideas such as:

Tell them which designs in my ‘Landscape Gems Collection’ you love,
Preferred colour of the gemstones featured…

….and then the commission process starts.


Please Note:

All of my silver designs are legally hallmarked by the Goldsmiths Assay Office London. This process takes between 7-14 days.

These gemstones have been personally and ethically sourced from around the world by Laura H Elliott over the years.

Carat weights stated are ‘average total gemstone weights’ (ATGW).


Commission Feedback:


“Having seen Laura’s work at an exhibition in London, I commissioned Laura to create 2 pendant pieces of jewellery to include birthstones. She was very happy to help and very professional, producing 2 stunning original pieces. They were packaged well and arrived safely. I would highly recommend Laura’s bespoke metal clay jewellery to anyone looking for a special piece of original artwork”

______________________

Dated: 21st April 2017

Lesley Oldaker was a direct commission client Landscape Gems Collection jewellery of metal clay designer Laura Elliott BA (Hons).


Customer Feedback and Recommendations:

I have over 10 years working as both an artist and curator and have references, which can be viewed by clicking here.


About the ‘Landscape Gems Collection’:

“My love of clay was discovered at the age of 14, exploring the endless possibilities of earthenware clay, enhanced with glazes, textures and glass.

It was in 2012 when I discovered the fresh, up and coming medium of metal clay in: Fine 999 Silver, Copper and bronze. Step by step I began to explore the possibilities of this medium and after 2 years of development it transformed into the body of work I now call the ‘Landscape Gems Collection’.

When fired, an elegant transformation takes place, turning each design from the pliable clay into solid metal designs. Each piece is sculptural and unique, which often include an unusual mix of high quality gemstones along side beautiful elements, such as glass, enamel, vintage watch parts or even bolts and screws.

This series was given new momentum when I exhibited my collection at The Royal College of Art with Flux exhibition in December 2015. Since this date, my designs have adapted into a series of ever changing mini sculptures and I have not looked back since.”


Fill Out the Contact Form Below to Inquire About Any Of the Pieces Above:



All artworks & designs displayed are © Copyright by Laura H Elliott BA (Hons), Dip

Buy my work online @ http://www.lhe-art.co.uk

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/laurahelliottart

Twitter @laurahelliott

Pintrest https://www.pinterest.com/lauraelliottart/

Linked In https://uk.linkedin.com/pub/laura-elliott-ba-hons/6b/959/533

#art #britishlandscapes #britain #landscapes #buybritish #laurahelliottart #laurahelliott #lhe #painting #metalclay #gemstones #artgallery #gallery #flux #fluxexhibition #degreeart #degreeartgallery #painting #artlover #artist #artwork #artcollector #contemporaryart #originalart #ownart #rca #contemporaryart #originalart #commissionart #buyart #buyartonline

• Review: Artsy Editorial – Kandinsky’s How To Be An Artist

Above:

Above: “Composition VII” (1913) by Wassily Kandinsky – In Collection At: The State Tretyakov Gallery

Review: Artsy-Editorial – Kandinsky’s How To Be An Artist

“I came across a fascinating editorial article on the Artsy website, written by author Rachel Lebowitz, about a master artist whom I deeply admire, the Russian painter Wassily Kandinsky. As I always do in my blog’s, I will interpret this article and apply it to my personal experience and practice in the arts.

Kandinsky taught at the Bauhaus for an 11-year period and detailed his art theories in books. He had complex and detailed ideas to convey about the practice and philosophy of art. This Artsy Editorial focused his ideas into five points of interest or “lessons”. Although I feel they are interesting “lessons” for my own painting practices I really believe they show only 5 of a complex and involved philosophy of the past master Kandinsky.

The true depth of Kandinsky’s concepts are in his books he authored. The first book he wrote was titled ‘Concerning the Spiritual in Art’ (1911). Within this book he laid out his tenets for artistic creation as a spiritual act. Kandinsky wrote a book called ‘In Point and Line to Plane’ (1926) in which he expands on elements such as rhythm and amplification. Each of these books delve in detail into his progressive practice and exploration as both a painter and tutor and could be of great interest if you wish to read about Kandinsky’s theories of practice.

The article author Rachel Lebowitz states:

“…Kandinsky did not intend for his theories to be prescriptive. Art making, he insisted, was about freedom. Nevertheless, there are several lessons that artists should heed if they are to meet Kandinsky’s requirements.” (1)

In my opinion, this article describes how Kandinsky felt his theories as ideas which can be drawn from, by artists. Therefore, although this article refers to each point as “lessons”, my opinion is that I do not think they should be so finite, maybe they should be guides, not lessons.

Kandinsky did not intend for his theories to be prescriptive. Art making, he insisted, was about freedom. Nevertheless, there are several lessons that artists should heed if they are to meet Kandinsky’s theories.

We start with five below that where highlighted in the Artsy article and the five “Lessons” are as follows:

Wassily Kandinsky Dreamy Improvisation, 1913 Pinakothek der Moderne, Bayerische Staatsgemäldesammlungen,

Above: Wassily Kandinsky ‘Dreamy Improvisation’ (1913)
– In Collection At: Pinakothek der Moderne, Bayerische Staatsgemäldesammlungen.

Lesson #1: Express your inner world, not the latest artistic trends

If we reflect on the history of art, it is littered with ever changing movements in art, which I feel could be referred to as “trends”. I always want to stay true to who I am as both a person and artist; therefore, I always draw on who I am as a person, with my artworks interpreting my persona and life experiences. I try to not focus on external trends and influences towards my work, but I do use this to progress and push my ideas forward.

The meaning of the word “merit” or the phrase I would chose to use is “artistic merit”. This phrase was not 100% clear to me when considering if that was directly relevant, so I looked up the definition of “artistic merit”:

“Artistic merit is a crucial term, as pertains to visual art. However, many people fail to distinguish between the problem of distinguishing art from non-art and the problem of distinguishing good art from bad art. In many cases, people claim that such-and-such object is “not art” or “not real art” when they intend to say that they do not consider it to be good or successful art.” (3)

I believe that art trends are interwoven with the concept of “artistic merit” or what people consider the value in art is always subjective; therefore, it is intrinsically linked with “artistic trends”.

Above: Wassily Kandinsky ‘Composition in red and black’ (1920) – In Collection At: The State Museum of Art, Tashkent

Lesson #2: Don’t paint things. Paint in abstract form

I understand the thought behind this lesson; however, I do not agree with blanket opinions on what an artist should or shouldn’t create.

On a personal level, lesson #2 has an interesting point regarding my own artistic journey and practice. Over the years I have always had the desire to further abstract my ideas and this is a style that I now feel freedom and peace within. However, I am talking about my work and this does not apply to each artist.

Above: ‘Mirage’ (2016) by Laura H Elliott

Every artist interprets life in their own individual way. This reiterates that art is highly subjective and also highlights how trends can impact in the arts and highlights how lesson #1 is hard to follow.

It was during the time when I was 16-18 years old that I had a teacher who always pushed me into direct replication or realism. This was evident in both her projects she gave us and her regular interventions when I was creating artworks. It was only aged 17, that I rejected her beliefs and I began to create what I wanted. It was at this age when I created an abstract sculpture. This piece was inspired by Picasso and based on an amphibian, often named as a ‘Jesus Lizard’ as it runs across the surface of water.

When I was 25 I began studying an Art and Media Diploma. It was during this time I was guided by a vastly different, vibrant tutor who encouraged a self-directed practices. It was a refreshing change and has directly contributed to my current practices to this day.

The article states how art is an “…outward manifestation of the artist’s psyche—of his or her authentic thoughts and feelings” (1).

I was 25 when I returned to studying and practicing art, having worked in the nursing field for years. I left behind direct ‘replicas’ of the world I saw around me and began to relax and move towards abstraction or simplification in my art. I find my abstract work a relaxing and deeply enjoyable experience, a new freedom. I think this lesson does not address how complex and intricate the process of development is an artists and, therefore, this lesson is not a belief I would support.

Above: Wassily Kandinsky ‘Gespannt im Winkel’ (1930)
– In Collection At: Collection Kunstmuseum Bern

Lesson #3: Approach color as a window into the human soul

The article states that inspiration for Kandinsky was found in the

“…Fauvist paintings he saw while living in Paris from 1906 to 1907—with their wild hues that were entirely divorced from the real world—proved to be even more influential. Embracing this type of freedom in color.” (1)

I think this encompasses my own practice and passion. I find freedom in colours, with each choice expressing my inner emotions and moods, allowing them to be expressed to the world. When I paint in an abstract expressionist style it allows me to relax and find true solace from both my mental and physical disabilities. In a way, they are a window into my soul and the soul of every artist, including Kandinsky.

Wassily Kandinsky ‘Violett’ (1923) – In Collection At: Redfern Gallery Ltd.

Lesson #4: Inject rhythm into your painting, like a musical score

I am not sure how to explain my own work in relation to music. I have had a deep seated passion and ear for music and the layers contained in every piece I hear. I have previously written about the impact of music on my work and this passion and inspiration has not dissipated. Granted, I do not deafen both myself and family with heavy metal anymore, but I listen and enjoy all types and styles as time passes.

Above: ‘Joy’ (2003) by Laura H Elliott

This article says Kandinsky felt “…as an artist used colors, he or she was in effect playing different musical notes, causing [he said] vibrations in the soul” (1).

Different colours resonate with each of us in different ways and this is how I interpret this idea by Kandinsky. When collectors buy my work, I see a tangible response and this could be the vibrations Kandinsky speaks of.

The article goes on to state that “…a painting would do well to be composed like a musical score.” I see a rhythm in all artworks, but I interpret this in an emotional response due to the person I am: emotional, complex and passionate.

I use my art as a therapy and see vibrations as emotion during and after creating each piece of work. My work since 2016 has contained a new wave of colours and this might enhance and develop my work like a piece of music, thus creating a rhythm.

Wassily Kandinsky ‘Composition’ (1925) – In Collection at: Leila Heller Gallery

Lesson #5: By creating original work, you will further the cause of humanity

This is a grandeous statement, however, I agree with its sentiment. It has to be said that art has been academically proven to be a key component in our lives and well-being, a therapy, so lesson #5 is the truth. Speaking for myself, art is a fundamental part of who I am as a individual and gives me clarity, solace and strength.

Above: ‘Forever Grateful’ by Laura H Elliott

I have to agree with lesson #5 as it highlights my own belief in work as an artist. I truly believe that art helps humanities living and well-being, despite the commonly held point of view that art is not as fundamentally important as academic areas.”

So….What do you think of Kandinsky’s five lessons?

Wassily Kandinsky ‘Untitled’ (1921) – In Collection At: Kunstmuseum Basel, Basel

Sources and Useful Links:

1) https://www.artsy.net/article/artsy-editorial-artist-kandinsky/amp

2) http://www.wassilykandinsky.net/book-117.php

3) http://www.definitions.net/definition/artistic%20merit

4) http://www.wassily-kandinsky.org/

5) http://studiosixtysix.tumblr.com/post/151158596757/13reasons

6) http://www.forbes.com/sites/drewhendricks/2015/01/12/can-office-artwork-influence-employee-productivity/#243c119d2c44

7) https://m.facebook.com/story.php?story_fbid=1138946616232550&id=100003516670643

8) http://studiosixtysix.tumblr.com/post/151158596757/13reasons

9) http://www.forbes.com/sites/drewhendricks/2015/01/12/can-office-artwork-influence-employee-productivity/#243c119d2c


All artworks & designs displayed are © Copyright by Laura H Elliott BA (Hons), Dip

Buy my work online @ http://www.lhe-art.co.uk

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/laurahelliottart

Twitter @laurahelliott

Pintrest https://www.pinterest.com/lauraelliottart/

Linked In https://uk.linkedin.com/pub/laura-elliott-ba-hons/6b/959/533

#art #britishlandscapes #britain #landscapes #buybritish #laurahelliottart #laurahelliott #lhe #painting

• Art In The Heart Gallery & Marketplace

Art In The Heart Gallery & Marketplace

I am delighted to be selling my work with Art In The Heart Gallery and Marketplace. The impact of other mass produced online platforms, means that the artist/ designers are getting swept aside in the market. I see Art In the Heart making a change.

My online gallery is at: https://www.artintheheart.co.uk/marketplace/store/lheart/

“I am so happy to have this wonderful fine silver jewellery maker on my new Art in the Heart online Marketplace. She has a store with me now. When I say jewellery…there is jewellery and then there is pure art. if you want a really special treasure for a special person, please have a look at these stunning pieces.”

By: Dawn Birch-James

I am looking forward to the future with Art In The Heart Gallery and Marketplace with Dawn Birch-James and her team


All artworks & designs displayed are © Copyright by Laura H Elliott BA (Hons), Dip

Buy my work online @ http://www.lhe-art.co.uk

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/laurahelliottart

Twitter @laurahelliott

Pintrest https://www.pinterest.com/lauraelliottart/

Linked In https://uk.linkedin.com/pub/laura-elliott-ba-hons/6b/959/533

#art #britishlandscapes #britain #landscapes #buybritish #laurahelliottart #laurahelliott #lhe #painting #metalclay #gemstones #artgallery #gallery #flux #fluxexhibition #degreeart #degreeartgallery #painting #artlover #artist #artwork #artcollector #contemporaryart #originalart #ownart #rca #contemporaryart #originalart #commissionart #buyart #buyartonline

• My Guide: What is Silver Metal Clay?

My Guide: Silver Metal Clay


What is Art Clay Silver?


Art Clay Silver is precious metal clay that looks and feels like ordinary sculpting or porcelain clay, with fine particles of pure silver mixed with a non-toxic organic binder.


What is metal clay and what work do you create from that medium?

Metal clay is an exciting art medium consisting of very small particles of metal such as silver, gold, bronze or copper which is mixed with an organic binder and water for use in making jewelry, beads and small sculptures. This is an Eco-friendly metal clay silver, containing recycled silver.

Originating in Japan in 1990, metal clay can be shaped just like any soft clay, by hand or using molds. After drying, the clay can be fired in a variety of ways such as in a kiln, with a handheld gas torch, or on a gas stove, depending on the type of clay and the metal within it. The binder burns away, leaving a pure sintered or solid piece of metal.

Above: ‘Wave’ – On the Left = Unfired and On the Right = Kiln Fired

After being fired, you are left with a fine silver piece that can be hallmarked as fine silver. This new formulated silver metal clay combines the best features from the former types of Art Clay – easy molding, slow drying, and a low firing temperature. The new silver clay formula has a better work-ability and longer working time, retains and accepts moisture easier, staying supple and easier to reconstitute, and also carves and files easier in the dry stage.

Every design I sell in Silver is hallmarked with my personal LHE hallmark, according to UK law (example shown above).


How do you fire the clay?

This art clay silver can be used with a torch/ gas stove or kiln for 30 minutes at 650°C or 5 minutes at 800°C. Shrinkage is 8-9%.

Image Courtesy of Cookson Gold #cooksongold

Different Silver Clay Products I Use:

1) Silver Clay:

I use Art Clay fine Silver clay, which is beautiful to work with and creates top quality designs:

2) Silver Metal Clay Syringes:

Use syringes to decorate your clay with squiggles and lines, to create little bezels to set lab created stones in, or on its own to make hollow filigree like designs. Simply create a core shape with cork clay and cover it with the syringe. When fired, the cork clay will burn away leaving a hollow delicate piece. Keep your syringes standing in a glass of water when you’re not using them. Remember to put it back as soon as you finish so the tip doesn’t dry out.

3) About Silver Metal ClayPaste:

Use the paste to glue (wet or dry) clay parts together, to repair cracks and fill in marks and bumps, and to add a textured surface to the clay. It can also be painted onto a burnable core, like a leaf, twig or cork clay, to create a fine silver replica.


My Journey Starting In Silver Metal Clay

Due to my life-long passion of clay and sculpture, I expanded my work in 2012 to use the exciting medium of silver, copper and bronze metal clay, in concert with my ‘Landscape Moods’ series of paintings. Metal clay allows me to sculpt work in a free form and expressive manner, allowing me to create a wide range of sculptural metal jewellery and this has been titled the ‘Landscape Gems’ series.


Can You Hallmark Silver and Gold Precious Metal Clay:

Yes, it is UK law that Silver, Gold, Platinum and Palladium have to be hallmarked over a specific weight. The information sheet below explains the law and it assures you that you are buying genuine precious metals:

Every design I sell in Silver is hallmarked with my personal LHE hallmark, according to UK law.


Are There Other Types Of Metal Clay?

Yes, there is other types of metal clay in many other brands: Different Brands of Silver Clay, Gold, Copper & Bronze:


All artworks & designs displayed are © Copyright by Laura H Elliott BA (Hons), Dip

Buy my work online @ http://www.lhe-art.co.uk

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/laurahelliottart

Twitter @laurahelliott

Pintrest https://www.pinterest.com/lauraelliottart/

Linked In https://uk.linkedin.com/pub/laura-elliott-ba-hons/6b/959/533

#art #britishlandscapes #britain #landscapes #buybritish #laurahelliottart #laurahelliott #lhe #painting #metalclay #gemstones #artgallery #gallery #flux #fluxexhibition #degreeart #degreeartgallery #painting #artlover #artist #artwork #artcollector #contemporaryart #originalart #ownart #rca #contemporaryart #originalart #commissionart #buyart #buyartonline

This entry was posted on November 1, 2017, in Art Projects.

• My Guide: Learning From Masters, Picasso to Pollock to Dali 

My Guide: Learning From Masters, Picasso to Pollock to Dali

Remember © Copyright – These Are Not For Sale!!

Just Inspiration and Learning!!

ALL of my studies are now in my loft, safe and sound! They are only for me to mentally reference and to draw inspiration from, as I have explored the vastly different techniques each artists used to create every stunning artwork. I loved every piece I re-created; however, I have not re-created any artists work since 1994-1995.


Why Re-Create Masters Work?

Simply put, to learn from their expert hand and varying techniques in art. There are endless guides and techniques on how masters created artworks, this shows how much you can learn from a simple collage or drawing or study or painting. I found it a really enlightening experience to truly learn how an artist created their work. I found that t

They are a challenge to reproduce, but that is why they teaches you so much. I think master studies are worth every minute. When I re-created Picasso’s cubist work, the complex gradients of colour and shade are a lesson for perspective within painting:

In addition, when you map out the cubist artwork you learn about proportion and dimension. I think this is a way round not having to learn perspective by drawing buildings, especially as I personally dislike drawing architecture.


What Do You Mean By “Master Studies”?

During my formative years navigating the arts, I found that the way I learn how, was by doing or creating.It was aged 17, that I was set a task to create a visual and written visual essay about a master that you wished to focused on as a study, for my A Level Art and Design course… this was when I found the idea of “Master Studies”.

My A Level Art and Design

The general gist was to write about a focal style in an artists work, with visuals to support. Most of these essays ended with a simple combination of written text and postcards or printed images of their chosen artists work. I decided to challenge myself to learn even more, so I began painting the works onto canvas boards or by re-creating the sculpture to sit along-side my own original work.

I felt that this theory applied to the all artists who inspired each painting I created for the course and the subsequent final exhibition of the course in 1995:


What Masters Did you Explore?

I studied a select few during my A Level Art and Design during 1994-1996, I studied the masters:

  • Pablo Picasso
  • Claude Monet
  • Edgar Degas
  • Salvador Dali

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BELOW SHOWS THE ORIGINAL ALONG-SIDE MY MASTER STUDIES:

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Pablo Picasso:

Below: My master study of a Pablo Picasso painting (1909-10) ‘Figure dans un Fauteuil (Seated Nude, Femme nue assise)’, Displayed at: Tate Modern, London

Left: My Master Study | Right: Original By Picasso

Below: My master of a Picasso artwork ‘Guitar’ (1913) At: The Museum of Modern Art, New York
Left: My Master Study | Right: Original By Picasso

Below: My master of a Picasso artwork ‘Siphon, Glass, Newspaper, and Violin‘ (1912) At: The Moderna Museet, Stockholm

Left: My Master Study | Right: Original By Picasso

——————————–

Salvador Dali:

Below: My master of a Dali painting ‘Gala and The Angelus of Millet Before the Imminent Arrival of the Conical Anamorphoses’ (1933) the original is displayed at: National Gallery of Canada, Ottawa

Left: My Master Study | Right: Original By Dali

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Edgar Degas:

I took this literally and I began to draw masters works, with a Degas Conte Pastel drawing (shown below) titled ‘Girl drying her feet after bathing’ by Degas:

Left: My Master Study | Right: Original By Degas

Above: Master Study ‘Girl drying her feet after bathing’ by Degas


What Modern Masters Do You Admire?

It was during my A Level that I was lucky to meet and spend a whole day interviewing and exploring the studio of Royal Academian Anthony Green. He was fascinating and charming and it was a day I will never forget. The painting below is by the amazing artist whom I had the privilege of interviewing in 1995, Anthony Green RA:

Since then, I have continued to learn about artists work past and present through academic routes, including my Art and Media Batchelor of Arts with Honours. I also cannot express how important it is to visit exhibitions at large museums and galleries, such as the Tate Modern, London and so on.

One artist I adore is the mixed media creator, David Hockney. I think of him as almost like a kindred spirit to me, with his exploration of perspective in both photography and painting. The way he flips perspective strikes a cord with me as that is something I like to explore in my paintings.

David Hockney:

Above: Created by © David Hockney

Maggie Hamblin:


What past master do you recommend as a starting point?

I think Vincent Van Gough is a great starting point and you are able to see his work at major museums around the world. He has a distinct technique and lends itself to high viscosity/ 3D paints or oil paints and a really appealing subject matter and colour scheme. In addition, his work is familiar with most people and this makes him a perfect first choice.

The artwork below is ‘Sunflowers’ by Vincent Van Gough:


Who are your favourite artists and why?

My first and most enduring love is Picasso and his cubist artworks, exploring colour, perspective and the transition of three-dimensional objects into a two-dimensional framework. I believe art that resonates and moves me on a personal level has the most long lasting influence on my work.

The deepest reaction I experienced was around 1996, when I visited the Tate Modern. I walked into this high ceiling room and was faced with an enormous series of paintings by Mark Rothko. The works and atmosphere had a profound impact and I needed to sit down. After a short time, I read the information on the artworks and the pieces were painted during a dark emotional period in Rothko’s life. Certainly, this was what caused be to feel emotional, it was like the artworks and colours swallowed me into his life. I can understand his need to express himself in this manner, something I have in common with artists such as Rothko.

Every exhibition I have visited has driven my work and have explored a large range of mediums both practically and from academic reading. I have enjoyed viewing Cypriot English artist Tracey Emin’s work, feeling that her freedom of her self and her personal experiences in life move me, as she is such an open book.

In addition, contemporary British painter Jenny Saville and American photographer Nan Goldin, but the artist I feel I relate to and am directly inspired by is the British contemporary artist Maggi Hambling due to her passion for expression of her life and visual diary. Maggi’s work is expressive, fascinating and her passion for the arts and other artists work is something I admire and hope to emulate.

Other artists I would recommend are:

Picasso, Monet, Degas, Dali and Jackson Pollock


How Do I Move Beyond The Masters?

This is hard to answer, but I think you need to consider what art inspires you, what medium you enjoy and what makes you happy. I have written a blog about a simple project idea below:

https://laurahelliott.wordpress.com/2016/09/07/%e2%80%a2-%e2%80%8bartist-project-1-abstract-expressionist-landscape/?preview=true

I have a few pictures below of an original design created by me of a three-dimensional sculpture of a Jesus Lizard, inspired by Picasso and made out of painted, slotted card:

Sculpture Trail 3D Lizard by Laura H Elliott BA (Hons) 1994

Sculpture Exhibition, Wokingham 1995: This sculpture is based on a ‘Jesus Lizard’ and inspired by my ‘muse’ who is Picasso. This piece was made in a jigsaw type of design. Each piece or facet was a piece of cardboard, hand painted and slotted together to make the lizard in this picture. I loved this project and it was very ‘out of the box’ for the project.


All artworks & designs displayed are © Copyright by artist Laura H Elliott BA (Hons), Dip or the artists stated.

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